US Coast Guard Just Made Massive Find Trying To Sneak Into The US

If you ever had any doubt whatsoever as to how broken our border system is, you need to look no further.

The Washington Examiner is now reporting that the Coast Guard seized nearly three-quarters of a billion dollars worth of illegal drugs (cocaine) over the past two months from smugglers who tried to move drugs by sea from Central and South America to the U.S. through international waters, according to a military spokesman.

A spokesman for the Coast Guard confirmed that they have intercepted $729 million dollars, or 52,900 lbs worth of cocaine just in the past two months. He added that 57 suspected smugglers were arrested and all the boats were confiscated.

Here is more via The Washington Examiner:

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“The Coast Guard seized nearly three-quarters of a billion dollars worth of cocaine over the past two months from smugglers who had attempted to move drugs by boat from Central and South America to the U.S. through international waters, according to a military spokesman.

Coast Guard vessels deployed to the region over the past two months intercepted traffickers and took approximately 52,900 pounds of cocaine valued at $729 million from those boats into custody, Coast Guard spokesman Chad Saylor confirmed to the Washington Examiner Monday.

Fifty-seven suspected smugglers were also taken into custody.

Three ships from the Coast Guard’s Medium Endurance Cutter fleet returned last week from deployments to the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Basin, which are high drug transit zones for cartels trying to ship product from Central and South America to North America.

Coast Guard Cutters Venturous, Steadfast, and Alert seized the majority of the cocaine, aided by Hamilton, Tampa, and Mohawk.

Each trafficker was first spotted by other military or law enforcement personnel who then alerted the Joint Interagency Task Force-South based in Key West, Fla., and a specific boat is ordered to respond,

CGC Alert interdicted a boat with 12,000 pounds of what it reported to be cocaine, worth $189 million, from several “go-fast” boats. The bust was the largest amount of cocaine ever seized in a single patrol, according to a press release.

“Low profile go-fast vessels are typically painted to blend with the water and are designed to ride low in the water to reduce their radar signature making them more difficult for law enforcement agencies to detect,” Lt. Cmdr. Dave Ratner, executive officer aboard the St. Petersburg, Fla.,-based CGC Venturous, said in a statement.

CGC Steadfast’s crew apprehended approximately 17,000 pounds of cocaine between late June and mid July.

“Their hard work means two things,” Steadfast Cmdr. Alain Balmaceda said in a statement. “First, more than eight tons of cocaine won’t reach our streets and add to the drug-related deaths and health problems facing our nation. And second, hundreds of millions of dollars are being denied to transnational criminal organizations who spread instability, d***h, and despair wherever they operate.”

In a statement, Lt. Cmdr. Dave Ratner, executive officer aboard the St. Petersburg, Fla.,-based CGC Venturous, confirmed that low profile vessels who tend to go at high speeds are typically painted to blend in with the water in order to reduce their radar signature which makes them harder to detect for law enforcement.

Steadfast Cmdr. Alain Balmaceda also said in a statement that the hard work they do means over 8 tons of cocaine won’t be reaching the streets of the U.S. and many won’t be dying because of this, not to mention that hundreds of millions of dollars have been taken away from transnational criminal organizations such as cartels who spread instability, d***h, and despair wherever they touch.

More on this via The United States Coast Guard:

“Numerous U.S. agencies from the Department of Defense, Department of Justice and Homeland Security cooperated in the effort to combat transnational organized crime. The Coast Guard, Navy, Customs and Border Protection, FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration and Immigration and Customs Enforcement along with allied and international partner agencies play a role in counter-drug operations. The fight against transnational organized crime networks in the Eastern Pacific requires unity of effort in all phases from detection, monitoring and interdictions, to criminal prosecutions by U.S. Attorneys in districts across the nation.

The Coast Guard increased U.S. and allied presence in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Basin, which are known drug transit zones off of Central and South America, as part of its Western Hemisphere Strategy. During at-sea interdictions in international waters, a suspect vessel is initially detected and monitored by allied military or law enforcement personnel coordinated by Joint Interagency Task Force-South based in Key West, Florida. The law enforcement phase of counter-smuggling operations in the Eastern Pacific is conducted under the authority of the 11th Coast Guard District, headquartered in Alameda, California. The interdictions, including the actual boardings, are led and conducted by members of the U.S. Coast Guard.

Steadfast and Alert are both 210-foot medium endurance Reliance-class cutters based in Warrenton, Oregon.”

So do you still honestly believe we have a secure border? While everyone is worried about our southern border, which is in dire need of a wall, drones and more Border Patrol agents, we have drug cartels sneaking poison into our neighborhoods by sea

Just imagine, if this is how much they caught, the amount that actually made it into our nation must be astronomical.

Note From the Editor: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of this website or of the owners/administrators of where this article is shared online. Claims made in this piece are based on the author’s own opinion and not stated as evidence or fact.

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